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Category Archives: Internet Explorer

I am right on the heals of hearing Apple’s CEO, Steve Jobs, wrap up this years WWDC keynote. I have to say that while the keynote didn’t introduce any big-ticket items that some Mac fans were looking for, I think it was what everyone realistically thought would happen. The biggest and most pleasant surprise came right out of the gate when EA Games announced that it will be bringing some of its most popular titles to the Mac, including EA Sports favorites starting in August. Steve continued on into Leopard, and like last year, showed 10 new features coming in the new version of OS X. He unveiled the sleek new desktop and finder, which all appear to be big gains; but, both are more or less eye candy. A new previewing feature called Quick look was introduced and that also looks very nice. Beyond that, nothing ‘new’ was really shown about Leopard. Steve Jobs re-outlined the features shown at last year’s WWDC.

Once the 10 features were covered, Jobs announced that Apple’s Safari has grown to nearly 5% of the browser market share. Furthermore, Apple plans to port Safari fully over to Windows XP/Vista. This should be very interesting and Steve announced that a beta of Safari 3 for Windows and OS X Tiger will be available today via www.apple.com/safari

Finally, ‘one more thing …’

Apple announced that it will open developers to the iPhone via Safari. Meaning that developers will be able to develop applications for iPhone using the latest in web standards within iPhone’s Safari browser. This news proved to be unpleasing to most developers, who wanted all out control to develop more client style apps for Apple’s much anticipated phone.

I will post more on this soon as possible but so far, this keynote is exactly what many expected. Sure, the games and Safari news was a surprised, but both are definite positives for Apple. While developers appear to be unpleased, I think it is not a decision that Apple wanted to make but had to because of AT&T. Much like Apple is puppeted with iTunes and DRM. Steve Jobs is all about healthy partnerships and he knows that forcing too much can hurt those partnerships. Apple also realizes that web development is a hot thing right now and is really where things are headed. So, this development move does not surprise or even upset me.

Tonight, like most nights, I found myself surfing the web and checking email rather late – later than I should, anyway. So, I stumble upon an email announcement from Microsoft informing consumers that starting now, you can purchase a “Vista Compatible PC” today and you may be eligible for what they are calling an Express Upgrade to Windows Vista. First off, my thought is “Express? Right … ” After laughing at the thought of Microsoft doing anything in an Express fashion, I took a look at the list of Vendors participating in this program – including the likes of Levono, HP, and Sony. One participator on the list included Dell – no surprise there – so I went to their “Vista Upgrade Site” to check out a few of the compatible machines that they are offering as apart of this program. After surfing for a moment, trying to find more details on how Dell is going about it, I notice they offer a link to www.dellvistaupgrade.com. What is even more stunning to me is the information that appears when the page displays which states that you will then be able to redeem your ‘voucher’ or whatnot after November 13, 2006. I am baffled here because all of the other manufacturer’s state that Vista will not be redeemable until Vista’s release, projected in early 2007. That date makes more sense because that is when it has been slated for a while. Now, my next thought was that maybe this November date posted by Dell is for the Enterprise edition for businesses, and this could be true. However, Other sources read that Enterprise editions will only be available via volume licensing, so why would Dell go public to the average consumer and post such a date for a business product without at least being more specific? Could this be a fast one that Windows attempted to pull on us but Dell has let out of the bag? Personally, I have my doubts and I believe that there is either a mix up or this ‘release date’ is for the Enterprise edition. What’s your take on it? In case this is a mixup or a ‘spilling of the beans’, and Dell clears off the information by the time you go to the link above, here is a link of a screenshot I took.

After five years and numerous security flaws, Microsoft finally makes the much needed significant update to Internet Explorer. On Thursday, Microsoft formally announced the release of its flagship web browser, Internet Explorer version 7. The new browser brings forth a dramatic change in appearance and usability. But that’s not all, IE7 packs plenty of new features and abilities to its security ravaged predecessor. IE7 brings in support for RSS (Real Simple Syndication) news feeds, and a few helpful anti-phishing and pop-up blocker tools. Most of these tools have already existed in IE’s competition, Firefox and Opera for some time.

However, less than a full day of its released, a Danish security company revealed a security flaw that IE7 has apparently picked up from its predecessor, IE6. Moreover, the security flaw has been considered ‘less critical’ and difficult to exploit.

Now that IE7 has released, I will take many of the new features listed earlier and expand on them and tell how accurate they really are. The big story for IE7 will be how much more secure it can be than IE6. With the added tools, it certainly does look more secure in nature. However, only time will tell; and as for me, I think I will stick with Firefox, version 2 which is primed for release any day now.